Things to look for when buying a sewing machine - Major Hoff Takes A Wife

Things to look for when buying a sewing machine

   

One of the questions I am asked a lot is what features I look for when buying a sewing machine. The fact is, there are a gazillion machines out there, along with a huge difference in price points. You can pick up a machine on sale for under $100 at Target, or you can go to a local dealer and pay over $12,000. Yes, You read that right. The cost of a compact car. I thought I would highlight a few things that I find important on a machine. 
Buying-a-sewingmachine-collage


Let's talk general machines for a minute

   There a a ton of brands out there in the sewing world. Janome, Bernina, Singer, Husqvarna, White, Viking, Babylock, and the list could go on. Sewing machines are a lot like cars. There are a lot of different manufacturers out there, and different options give you different price points. In the sewing world some brands (like White, Singer, etc) are considered more like Fords. They get you where you need to go, but they don't have a lot of bells and whistles. Others, like Bernina, are considered the BMW's. They get you to your destination, with heated leather seats, navigation, sound system, etc. Others are like the Toyota's or Honda's. They get you were your going, and will get you there even after 200,000 miles. You need to pick the features you want on a machine, just like when you picked your vehicle. All of that is personal opinion. And to clarify, I'm not knocking any cars or machines. 


      That being said, there are several features that I feel are ESSENTIAL to make you better at sewing. Features that time after time seem to make a big difference. Some of these features are offered on the machines down at Target or Walmart. Some are not. You don't have to buy at $12,000 machine to get these features. You may have to pay more than $100, but really not that much more. So lets get started!

Janome sewing machine

SPEED CONTROL

    The most common complaint I hear from people is about that tricky little foot pedal. You barely push down and your machine takes off like a bat outta hell. There is an option on machines called speed control. Its usually a little sliding button that can be adjusted manually from very very very slow to super sonic speed (well, maybe not that fast). Its a beautiful thing when you are trying to sew around a tricky corner or topstitch very evenly on a seam to be able to go slooooooooow and make sure every stitch counts. Likewise, if you are doing a long drape panel and wanna tear through that seam in a minute or two, crank it up! I like to tell people its a lot like learning to drive. When you are teaching your 16 year old to drive, you don't shove them in a car, set cruise on 70 mph and tell them to go to town. You start out slow on country roads. You practice getting the feel of the foot pedal, to see how touchy it is. You ease into it. Sewing should be the same. For people who have never sewn before a needle going up and down super fast right next to their fingers can cause a lot of anxiety. Slowing it down makes it less nerve wracking. I've been sewing for a long time (over 2 decades peeps) and I don't have a single machine that doesn't offer this feature. It is my favorite. I use it ALL the time.
sewing machine needle up down speed control

NEEDLE UP/DOWN

     Another feature I enjoy is the needle up/down button. it is usually a button on the machine near the speed control slider. If your needle is down and you press the button it raises, and vice versa. Usually there is another function on the machine where you can choose if the machine always leaves the needle down (or up) when you stop the foot pedal. I prefer to leave mine down. It stabilizes the material, holds your place, and makes turning corners easy. I love being able to push the button when I am done, pop up the needle and slide out my fabric. My Janome Magnolia and 9500 both have this feature, as does my Singer. My Bernina 730 only has the option of setting the needle to stop up or down. If I want to raise it or lower it there is no button. It is located at the bottom of the foot pedal instead. This drives me batty. My hands naturally gravitate to where I think it should be on the machine.

sewing machine stitches straight zig zag

DECORATIVE STITCHES

     I'm gonna be honest and tell you, unless you are sewing heirloom garments, 9 times out of 10 you are not going to need to have over 20 stitches. They are nice to have, but in all honesty they are rarely used. The basics stitches will suit you just fine 99% of the time. The straight stitch will be used the majority of the time. You can sew seams and topstitch with it. The zig zag stitch is a little bit fancy looking, but can be adjusted so you can make satin stitches (the decorative edge around appliqués). This takes a bit of practice, but isn't that hard to do. The stitches that have the dashes/spaces in them (usually a straight and zig zag) are fabulous for sewing on knit fabric. That little skipped dash/space allows for the knits to stretch like they are intended too. A button hole-- If you are brave enough to put on buttons, the simple button hole is great. For some reasons button holes freak people out, but really they are very easy to do. The blind hem is also another tricky stitch people fear, but is also pretty easy. Its handy for not leaving stitches visible. Perfect for drapery or hemming dress pants. All of the stitches can be taught by watching videos on you tube. 

Bernina embroidery

CLASSES

    If you buy your machine at Joann's, Walmart or Target, you won't get classes with it. If you buy your machine at a dealer, chances are your gonna get at least one. Machines from a dealer tend to be a little more money than from the big box stores. However, if you can't figure out why your machine isn't doing what you want, you can usually stop in and if its something simple they will probably help you out quickly. If your new to sewing and they offer classes, even better! Its a great way to get acquainted with your machine and feel comfortable after a demonstration of its capabilities. There is something to be said about establishing a relationship with a dealer. Sometimes you need them to be your friend. Like the time I had a special order quilt and my son cut my foot cord pedal. They didn't have any in stock, it would be a week. The quilt was a last minute order with rush delivery. I knew the manager enough to ask in a nice voice if he would loan me a foot pedal from one of the floor models. He happily obliged. He is still one of my favorite managers ever. That said, I don't have a local Bernina dealer. This has worked towards my disadvantage many times. For the most part I have been able to fix my problems or learn new things by watching youtube or googling the issue. If you are a hands on person who can take instruction in that manner then having a local dealer may not be a deal breaker for you.


       So there's my own personal opinion. I've been sewing since before I could drive and am now in my glorious (late) 30's. I have 5 machines and love them all. This seems to be a question I get a lot when people find out that I am a seamstress. These are even  things I wish I would have told someone before they bought the machine they complain to me about.  Take it for what its worth, it's just an opinion. Buying a machine is a lot like a car (AGAIN!). You might enjoy the Camry or you might prefer the Accord. Get out and test drive them! 
      So what is your favorite function? Do you have an opinion on sewing machines? I would love to hear what you think!

Do you have an opinion on sewing machines? I would love to hear what you think!

Home Stories A2Z
Photobucket

30 comments

  1. I need to take a sewing class, because no matter what I do I can't sew a straight line! Do you know of a feature that can fix that?! LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Haha Eliesa! Do you have speed control? Slowing down helps things over all. But there are other things you can do. Figure out how far over you want the seam to be. Say its a curtain panel and you want an inch seam. Measure (usually your machine has marks) over and tape a post-it note there. The fabric lines up with the post it and makes it easier to follow. They also sell magnet seam guides that help, but a post-it note is free!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I wish I had this info last year when I had to replace my old machine. I don't have speed control or needle up/down, and I wish I did! I tell you, I could really use speed control. Thanks, Sara for sharing your expert advice.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Nice and full of info! I would love to have a machine with speed control! I'm usually just flaming through at Mach 4!

    ReplyDelete
  5. After using my old Singer for almost 30 years, I just bought a new machine. I will say my new machine has speed control, option on the needle stopping up or down, some decorative stitches (but I too knew I wouldn't use these much), and the place I bought offered classes. What did I buy? A Brother NX 250. It was over $600, but sews quietly and wow, the needle threader is super easy to use. I love it so far.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great info! Exactly what I would recommend! Passed it on to a friend who is machine shopping.
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  7. My machine is so old it doesn't have any of these features! It's a black Singer with the tension on the side and was made in the early 50's. I know--it's old. But it does what I need it to do. :) I do wish I had the speed button and the needle up/down features.

    ReplyDelete
  8. What type of machine do you recommend for more heavy duty sewing like pillows & draperies that use heavier materials and trims?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Cashmere Pen! Thanks for asking--good question. I have some friends that use older industrial machines for heavier materials, but I have never had that issue. For the most part all 3 machines can do all that I need (especially with regards to home dec and pillows and draperies). I think the Bernina advertises that it can go through 9 layers of fabric? A lot of it has to do with settings (pressure, type of foot used, etc). If your machine is struggling, you might try a google search or youtube search for tips on that material. If you are looking for a machine, you could look to see how many layers they say they sew through. I hope that helps. I'm just always amazed at how resilient mine are.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I totally need a new machine! I'm ready to switch from a beginner machine to something a little more durable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. keep me posted on your machine search!

      Delete
  11. Great tips. My mom just bought me a sewing machine for $7 at a yard sale. I'm pretty sure it's one of the $100 models. I'm going to plod along and try to learn on it, but I'm pinning your list to consult if/when I'm in the market for a new machine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is a great way to start Amy! Who knows, you might have scored a gem!

      Delete
  12. Great details. I even learned a bit more about my machine from this post! thanks for sharing! :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. I need a new machine! Mine is mustard yellow and from the 70s. It does great, but I would love to have some of the fancier features. This helps a lot!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A new machine is always exciting! Keep me posted and cherish your mustard machine!

      Delete
  14. I wish I had had this three years ago! Great information and I'm going to keep it on hand for my hopefully soon machine.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Super helpful! My Brother (a Ford, lol) has all these features -- I love it! The one thing I'd love is a thread cutter. My mom's Jamone has one and it's such a cool feature.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The thread cutter sometimes tends to the part that can wrong on a machine. I forget it is there half the time. LOL. Those Brothers keep on trucking! Glad you found a keeper!

      Delete
  16. Cindy Jackson (Somebodylaughed) teaches a class to beginners on the basics of a sewing machine. If you don't mind, I'll share this great info with her.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That would be great Tracey! I love Cindy, and hope her class would find it helpful!

      Delete
  17. Great tips! I have a basic Kenmore from Sears that we bought our first year married, and there are still things I don't know about it :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. I would not buy a machine without dual feed-where it feeds from the top and the bottom-especially if I wanted to quilt. I've had the same Pfaff for 33 years and I've NEVER had it repaired or serviced. Just kept it oiled and it runs like a top.And I've used it ALOT! If you are serious about sewing, one of these or a Bernena is the only way to go. But I have found that Janomes are great mid-range machines as well. I bought one for my daughter for Christmas a few years ago and I've used it a couple of times at her house.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cyndi. Yes, dual feeds are great for quilting! But they can add a higher price point. Several of my machines do have it, but for those looking for a lower cost machine, I would suggest that they pick up a walking foot (which will add a set of feed dogs on the top). Usually very inexpensive in terms of an accessories and worth it's weight in gold!

      Delete
  19. I have to laugh. I currently have 6 machines. But that's because I used to teach. I also have a Bernina that is sick and I can't afford to fix. I have two older (metal body) singers that are my fav's. I also have 100.00 ish Singers and Brothers machines.
    What that's more than six I need to count.
    With all that said I think your post is spot on. I would never recommend a beginner to spend $$$'s on a machine. I have quilted baby to king quilts on a $125.00 machine that has had gosh I don't even know how many hours sewing time.
    These are little work horses! I'm not quilting heirloom quilts. I quilt fun utility quilts that are meant to be used not looked at and awed.
    And, I do not use a walking foot. I'm a maverick.
    I enjoyed your post!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Great tips! I am definitely starting the search to upgrade my inherited vintage machine and needed a good place to start! I'll keep you posted as I get closer to making my decision!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for commenting! I appreciate it and love communicating with you!

Back to Top